What is 'wild' in an urban setting?

I’m just wondering with managed, rewilded areas, when is it considered ‘wild’, and how does that compare to residential areas that have long-term flora and fauna living there?

Are you talking about both animals and plants in restored areas?

I could be wrong, but I think the iNat guideline is this: that the first generation that is brought in, is not wild, but subsequent generations that happen by themselves without any intervention, are wild.

But I am not sure what you mean by how does it compare with residential areas with long-term flora and fauna?

If the flora and fauna that you find in residential areas (for example, weeds, rodents, etc) is managing to both support itself and reproduce without any deliberate human intervention, then again, the first generation might have been brought in by humans, but the subsequent generations are considered wild.

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I think that applies to plants (since they can’t move). I think with animals once it is released it is considered wild (since they can go somewhere else if they want). The help has some details about what is considered wild or not.

But even with plants, how can one tell if a plant is first, second or tenth generation?

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There is an extensive discussion of the topic here https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/the-category-of-cultivated-is-problematic-for-plants-in-urban-landscapes/2317

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So the definition of wild is ‘self-sustaining’. But it seems that in an urbanised setting, ecologies are no longer cultivated by humans and other species, like they have since the first ecology on the planet. Urbanisation is atomisation, therefore, the cultivation is atomised into an individual plant (for example) which can’t sustain itself. Regardless of the iNaturalist definition of ‘wild’, it has nothing to do with whether or not it is cultivated. One could argue the current atomised ecology has cultivated this paradigm in the people who came up with the definition.

hey all, this has been discussed in depth in the other thread, fine to continue the discussion, but maybe do so there instead of here?

As KitKestrel posted above, here: https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/the-category-of-cultivated-is-problematic-for-plants-in-urban-landscapes/2317 There are also other threads