How will you be buried?

Wow, @mkremedios I did not know that about farm workers and hospitals! Do you by any chance have a link to that study?

I like the idea of conservation burial. It’s basically a normal natural burial, but it takes place on a parcel of wild land that belongs to a conservation cemetery but doesn’t have permanent legal protection. From what I’ve read (and depending on local laws), by burying bodies in a conservation cemetery it becomes indefinitely protected, hopefully preventing any future destruction due to construction or natural resource exploitation on the land.

1 Like

At my favorite data and specimen collection site in Oregon. : )
I wouldn’t mind being buried with some decomposers on me, maybe some carrion and burying beetles, and some native tenebs, and a buttload of worms. I will be the next round of fertilizer.

And maybe. Just maybe, I will get to haunt the place and get rid of anyone throwing rocks at the animals, or cutting the grass and killing off the ferns and small animals. : ) If you have read all of my replies in the forum, and remember them, you will probably figure out the location I am talking about. If you do, go ahead and email me.

Cheers!

2 Likes

I would prefer to be eaten boy coyotes and vultures, to be honest. I can see why it might be a bad idea to get coyotes used to eating dead humans, but i don’t see any reason for the meat to be wasted. Whatever does or doesn’t happen to our soul and consciousness after dying, i don’t see any point in going through extrordinary means to keep my dead body from decomposing. Cremating is a bit more appealing to me but uses a lot of energy.

3 Likes

Another reason to be given to the beetles and other decomposers.

3 Likes

“I don’t want anybody to make any fuss. When I go, I just want to be stood outside in the garbage with my hat on.” – Lou Grant, character on the old Mary Tyler Moore Show.

3 Likes

the garbage men would have an opinion on that tho

Knock on the door - garden waste is on Tuesdays. You’ll have to keep him in the green bin till next week.

3 Likes

Coming from a farm family, I think my dad would have liked the idea that i could say :“Looks like dad raised another good crop this year”. We grew apples, pears and some cherries.

2 Likes

In my country, the only alternative is natural burial and which is the best for the nature in my opinion. There is no casket or any anti-decomposing practices. There is even a phrase for it, “we came from the soil, and we will return to it”

Last year, my beloved father passed away and we buried him naturally. I’ve reserved the spot next to him so my final resting place is already fixed :)

3 Likes

Welcome to the forum! Nice to see you around here :)
As on the main site, happy to answer questions. You can send me a direct message if you are having trouble finding a topic :)

Too bad that doesn’t work with at-sea burials!

This made me think back to this thread here.
Last week my friend Jade died from a lung disease (I don’t know what specifically, I already forgot) and she had wanted to be buried along with 20 lbs. of earthworms, and as many native carrion beetles as could be found. Her mom disliked this idea, but her dad though it to be a great idea. We collected as many carrion beetles from Marion/Polk Counties as we could, and just over 21.5 lbs of earthworms.
Unfortunately I was unable to attend her funeral o’ arthropoda, but I did assist with finding 20 random carrion beetles (rotting meat baited traps) and then passing those on to her family for her special request.

Hope you’re still having fun with click beetles wherever you are now Jade.

2 Likes

I think that in the future, green burials will become very common, I saw a video done by Vox, that talk about that. Basically, we need to change how we bury people, for various reasons, very sorry for your loss.

1 Like