Rarest Finds on Inaturalist

3 years 8 months later, interesting to compare.

Neolucanus castanopterus, was 1/1 now 1/35
Leptotarsus alexanderi, I was 1/2 now I am 2/3
Cerozodia hudsoni, still 1/1
Gynoplistia ocellifera still 1/1
Gasteracantha unguifera, was 3/3 now 3/7
Algidia viridata, was 3/4 now 17/23

New 1s since then

https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/1527590-Apolecta-diversa (1/1)
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/1227594-Darisa-leledaria (1/1)
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/943429-Dynamostes-audax (1/1)
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/387302-Cenefia-westlandica (2/2)
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/1496431-Pseudaega (1/1 genus level)
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/970570-Teleopsis-trichophoras (1/1)

Of the 1/2s this is one of my faves https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/797438-Cyriocosmus-itayensis (I am not the lead image but most recent obs).

https://elias.pschernig.com/wildflower/leastobserved.html?user=sebastiandoak am at 72 at “10 or less” guess the next aim is to get that to 100. But I also hope the low number ones inspire others to find and report thier obs of them.

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Not the best photo, but I did find the rare Theridion australe. It’s also a new-to-Ohio species!

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@dianastuder
Eat your heart out some more:

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/91507581

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/11205272

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/92945082

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/95187673

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/14717773

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/11332976

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/16925669

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/17312021

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/16866775

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/16867550

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/16866774

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110763443

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104807947

What great fun going back and revisiting all of these! I have big gaps in species ID’s in more remote places so I’m sure there’ll eventually be more!

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a bonus!

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/17108578

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Living in New England and being an amateur to iNat and wildlife photography means the stuff I’m seeing is essentially always something that someone else has seen, with more care and a better camera lens than myself. However, I was lucky to visit the Turks and Caicos islands about a month ago, where I saw a fly that I previously thought was a member of the genus Penniverpa. This was already a big surprise as the genus had no previous records in these islands, and you can probably guess I was excited - this was an actually substantial contribution to science!
Yesterday I, through the needed help of someone much more learned on flies than I am, got the observation reidentified to the genus Insulotitan, an even more unrepresented genus that was also an iNat first for the islands. I doubt it’ll make it to species given GBIF has no records of the flies from Turks and Caicos as well (and it appears species are best defined by where they are found, considering the lack of physical specimens/photographs available on iNat or anywhere else), but I’m still immensely excited and proud to have been able to see this animal!
Observation:
medium

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I left you a comment about it.

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I don’t have anything of value to add, I just want to say that “Insulatitan” is an amazing name for something as small as a fly… :D

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Thank you! I was very interested to hear about this.
Here’s the article from that comment in case anyone wants it.

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Truly is. Feels like something comically assigned to a dinosaur genus before they find out it’s already in use by an insect… (which happens a lot in paleontology)

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At least 4 times iirc

Rare for a city dweller like me was one of my last weeks observation, the first of its kind for Amsterdam. Although unconfirmed, I think the CVS identified it correctly.

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With climate change moving species northward, seeing southern stuff show up in Massachusetts has made me be on the lookout for new stuff.
Palm Trees
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/193582908