What Observations Have Been Your Most Dangerous/Hard to Get?

I got up close and personal with a unique looking fly only to find out later that it was a deer fly. Whoops.

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Interrupted mating lions while walking an island in the Okavango. Five participants, two guides, one stick. The speed with which this guy went from 100 yds to 100 feet was impressive. No time to be scared. We slowly backed away from the bluff charge.

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/122342125

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This (it was just a young one!*!): https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/3689493

and this one which led to some nasty bruises on a rock slide: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/1820151

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Blundering into a large carnivore in the backcountry certainly qualifies as a dangerous encounter, but I suspect more of us have had the falling-down-a-slope-and-almost-killing-oneself experience while trying to photo something far less dangerous!

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I found this rattlesnake, which I suspected was a Mojave Rattler (my first living one!) and only took profile photos at first, while I crouched. I then realized I probably wanted to get a shot of the supraocular scales to get a solid ID and stood up to do so. This cause it to strike at me a few times, which was pretty scary! Not smart, on my part.

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I did something similar with a Mojave that was coiled up in the cool of the morning … bent way over to closely check the head scales and confirm the ID. Kind of dumb but the snake wasn’t too active.

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