Bird locations (North America)

I was sent this link from ‘Birds Canada’. Click on a location, and it will show the birds there at a certain date. I do not know how well it works outside of Canada. https://www.birdscanada.org/apps/checklist/index.jsp?bblinkid=210342488&bbemailid=19971185&bbejrid=1409241500&fbclid=IwAR34fhGIFtm861-1-n6fi-lQ5pgaTvDXyIpqaJnMA1IGD2Ckdi7BhzqadnM

2 Likes

It returned some results for a location near me in New York City, so it’s not exclusively for Canada.

It seems to limit you to a specific date (not that I investigated very thoroughly), so it’s difficult to say how it compares to a similar search on iNaturalist.

1 Like

I would recommend using eBird bar charts (that’s where the data for this comes from). You can select hotspots in explore hotspots or counties (are they called ridings in Canada?) in “explore locations”. Then look at the illustrated checklist, which provides a bar chart and the percentage frequencies by week when you hover over the bars. For example: https://ebird.org/hotspot/L351715/media?yr=all&m=

1 Like

They are called different things in Canada between or even within our provinces, either called counties, districts, municipalities or regions in Canada, but not ridings. Ridings are our electoral districts.

1 Like

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

I need to say that I have absolutely no affiliation to Birds Canada. I simply thought it was an interesting link that people might use, one that happens to come from that organisation. Use it or not.

The data is taken from eBird, so that part works worldwide, but there are only photos for Canadian birds. So if you select, say, Germany, you’ll get a handful of widespread waterfowl and gulls, but nothing endemic to Eurasia. In other words, outside of Canada you’ll get a list which is missing many common species.

Also, this tool was designed for people organizing events for beginners, so an event organizer can quickly create a checklist for wherever and whenever the event is and print off 25 copies for a group. It isn’t meant as a replacement for a field guide, just as a friendly-looking easy way to introduce people to birdwatching. So only the most commonly observed birds are included, which are mostly species which can be seen at bird-feeders and in city parks.

(Also, I see the recent move to a new website template has broken the layout so you don’t get 4 photos per row. I’ll send a bug report to the creator.)

1 Like

Thanks. It was sent to me by a person who was designing an event for what I assume are new iNatters. Makes sense, then - I have never used it.

This topic was automatically closed 60 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.