Could you introduce me to the strange plants in your country?

We still, thankfully, have a local Thismia species, Thismia rodwayi:

Image from iNaturalist user @katyabandow, from observation: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/99758763, CC-BY-NC

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Not particularly strange here, but perhaps of interest: Jack in the Pulpit, Pussytoes, Wood horsetail and Ghost pipes

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I used to live in Mexico and one of my favorite plants was Tigridia vanhouttei. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/332822

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It’s hard when you’re not in tropics.
2 parasitic species: Common Toothwort and Dutchman’s pipe
And a floating fern

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It’s funny to see those common names associated with parasitic plants - just shows how many names are applied to more than one plant species. Over here, toothworts are white to pink blooming spring ephemerals in the mustard family and nothing special, though what we call Dutchman’s pipe might be another good candidate for a strange plant list.

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Yeah, common names is a very interesting topic!
In Russian Lathraea squamaria is called Common (or Scaled) Petre’s Cross (after roots that look like cross), Scale, Tsar-weed and some other quite weird names.
Monotropa hypopitys modern name is something like Under-fir and also have another name which is even harder to translate so it could sound normally, but something like Twirling, named after the fact that after flowering their stem straightens.
We only have one species from Aristolochiaceae which imo is a very strange-looking family! I can’t say it’s an interesting plant, but it has small and hard-to-find flowers: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/75195962

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We have a sister species to that one, too (Asarum canadense), although here it’s called wild ginger. Which is odd, because it is not related to ginger, which is a pretty odd plant itself.

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There are several carnivorous plant species here in southeast Texas. This includes quite a few bladderwort (Utricularia) species. I’ve seen some terrestrial ones. Their traps are underground, just the flower sticks up. This is one of the species I’ve seen: https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/170087-Utricularia-juncea . I’d love to find a floating one like this species: https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/170086-Utricularia-inflata . We also have one pitcher plant species https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/123545-Sarracenia-alata , one butterwort species https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/166889-Pinguicula-pumila , and two sundew species https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/162094-Drosera-capillaris (and D. brevifolia)

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Weird orchids I have seen in east Texas:
Green Adder’s-Mouth https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/154999-Malaxis-unifolia
Crane-fly Orchid https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/121490-Tipularia-discolor (Already mentioned in this thread. I have also heard them called Crippled Crane-fly)
Waterspider Bog Orchid https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/155102-Habenaria-repens (I have seen growing both as terrestrial and floating mats)
Southern Twayblade https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/209199-Neottia-bifolia
Large Whorled Pogonia https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/62184-Isotria-verticillata (I haven’t seen this one in bloom yet)

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This is Sphaerocarpos, a rarely seen marchantiophyte!

In the wild, it inhabits seasonally dry habitats but it dies soon after drying up; the spores survive until the next rainy season. Cultivated specimens can become “immortal” if kept constantly wet, oddly enough.

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I call it that in Austin, TX. Due to COVID, I don’t have much exposure, so I don’t know how widespread it is.

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In California, one of our strangest plants is strange for its enormous size: Giant Sequioa

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I photographed a toothwort too, Lathraea clandestina. These are pretty strange looking.

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That is really cool. It made me think of a plant we have here in southeastern US. But this one comes back from the “dead”. In dry weather Resurrection Fern will shrivel up, turn brown, and look dead, but it perks back up as soon as it rains. It’s an epiphyte. It seems to especially like to grow on the broad horizontal limbs of Live Oaks. https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/698726-Pleopeltis-michauxiana