Identification Etiquette on iNaturalist - Wiki

#103

I can’t help thinking of Linnaeus and his “Inquisition of the Pastures”… walking around a meadow with a bunch of enthusiasts and picking stuff up and discussing it!

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#104

wow… our first “topic” to get to 100 posts… is not even a topic but a tutorial! And it was only just barely over a week ago that it got started (on the 27th)

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#105

This is when I do Edit > Delete on the identification. If it is there by silly mistake on my part instead of actual misidentification then I feel there is no good reason to leave it on the page. YMMV

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#106

what does YMMV mean?

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#107

YMMV = “Your mileage may vary” (meaning, basically, “I understand that different people might have different opinions”)

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#108

I Googled this and couldn’t find a reference but would like to read about it - can you point me to something?

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#109

https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/carl-linnaeus/

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#110

Linnaeus’s theories and methods were always rooted in the real world. At a time when taxonomists were largely an indoor species, inhabiting lecture halls and libraries and scrutinising pressed flowers, pinned insects and pickled vertebrates, Linnaeus was a dirt-under-the-fingernails scientist. For more than 20 years he conducted public excursions in the countryside around Uppsala—possibly the world’s first guided nature walks. He did so partly to supplement the income from his impecunious postings as curator of the Uppsala botanic garden and then as professor of medicine at Uppsala University. Participants (as many as 300 per excursion) paid him in whatever currency they could afford: coins, hats, socks, books, buttons.

“Win fame through deeds” was Linnaeus’s heraldic motto and the energetic Swede lived up to that dictum. As a professor at Uppsala he inaugurated weekly botanical rambles for his students, but was forced to desist because the events were judged too pleasurable by the university’s censorious rector. Linnaeus was a much admired teacher and mentor, but late in life he was ignored and ostracised by many of his favourite students.

“Win fame through deeds” was Linnaeus’s heraldic motto and the energetic Swede lived up to that dictum. As a professor at Uppsala he inaugurated weekly botanical rambles for his students, but was forced to desist because the events were judged too pleasurable by the university’s censorious rector. Linnaeus was a much admired teacher and mentor, but late in life he was ignored and ostracised by many of his favourite students.

19TH CENTURY LITHOGRAPH

What forays they must have been! Botanising with Linnaeus would have been the equivalent of studying geometry with Euclid, or taking a writing class with Shakespeare. In keeping with Linnaeus’s orderly disposition, expeditions were organised with the precision of a military campaign, with designated note takers, specimen collectors and bird shooters. A bugle would sound when a rare species was found. Trophy flowers and butterflies were pinned with pride to the wide-brimmed hats worn by the budding botanisers.

At the end of one of these rambles—which could last up to 12 hours during the Baltic summer months—the party would troop back to town, waving banners, blowing horns and beating kettledrums. Linnaeus led the procession, stopping periodically for last-minute specimen hunting on the sod roofs of the town houses. At the botanic garden a shout would go up: “Vivat Linnaeus!”

In later years these “inquisitions of the pastures,” as Linnaeus called them, had to be curtailed after the rector of Uppsala University protested at the enthusiasm of the participants. “We Swedes are a serious and slow-witted people,” he explained. “We cannot, like others, unite the pleasurable and fun with the serious and useful.”

Linnaeus had no difficulty reconciling the two. For him knowledge and rapture were two sides of the one coin. “The contemplation of nature gives a foretaste of heavenly bliss,” he declared.

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#111

I think maybe there should be something here to address experts who ignore the (recently active) observer in their comments and tag and talk to each other instead, correcting the observation and thanking each other for correcting it, as if the observer doesn’t need to be included in the discussion at all.

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#112

absolutely! The problem is usually the other way around (unresponsive observer) so to ignore a responsive observer is very arrogant (IMHO)

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#113

maybe arrogant is too strong a word… inconsiderate?

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#114

Yes, I think it’s more like people are in their own bubble, sort of feeling like they can talk to each other and no one else will be able to see their conversation. Sort of like the new people who don’t think anyone will see their observations.

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#115

I’ve been guilty of that myself if it’s unresponsive observer etc, but I was thinking more about the times when the observer is actually trying to be a part of the conversation, but being ignored. It got me to thinking about the convos I’ve had, and could they be interpreted that way!

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