#IdentiFriday is the happiest day of the week

And I’m done for tonight now with 75. Not as many as I planned to, but I’m happy with that!

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there are 2 species of cottontail rabbits in my area, and i just learned that the Swamp Rabbit (Sylvilagus aquaticus) often has a more reddish-yellow ring around its eye vs the white ring of the Eastern Cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus). (the Swamp Rabbit is bigger, too, of course, but that’s often hard to judge in photos.) so for this IdentiFriday, i’ll probably try to go through some of my local genus-level observations to get them down to species, if i can: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?lrank=genus&place_id=110679&taxon_id=43096.

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That’s something I’ve been working on too sometimes. Swamp rabbits also put their scat up on high surfaces like on top of logs. I assume because they are using their scat as a territory scent marker which could be washed away on the frequently wet ground where they prefer to live. I have noticed a subtle difference in the shape of their head too. If there are any you aren’t sure of you can tag me.

I have Swamp Rabbits in my backyard
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?project_id=79239&taxon_id=43116

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Same! Desert has larger ears and bodies and is found at lower elevations than mountain cottontails in New Mexico

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I can’t do a lot of ids, but try to keep local projects clean, I finished https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/identify?project_id=bioraznoobrazie-leningradskoy-oblasti, so if anyone wants to check it, it has mainly fungi and plants, but also lots of birds and insects, so if you know Northern European fauna/flora, those should be not new to you!

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What do you mean “clean”?

Having everything reviewed.

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I did 30 eastern cottontail vs swamp rabbit IDs. I also changed the thumbnail for swamp rabbit because it was the same as the genus and kind of confusing.

Back to working on my trail cam video editing project. I just posted this video of a swamp rabbit swimming: https://youtu.be/hOv3oeYF_30

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this is good stuff. i was looking for video of swimming swamp rabbits a while back to try to figure out if something i saw from a distance swimming in the water was a rabbit or a nutria, and there were only 2 videos out there at the time. (one of those videos even claims to be the first time swamp rabbits had been filmed swimming.) now yours is the 3rd, i think.

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I just looked at the video…oh nooo… another Gerald possibility…

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LOL :laughing: Didn’t think about that. I just added it to the project.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/127390307
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/geralds-of-the-world

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On another Friday (eve), we celebrate @susanhewitt
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/68606-identifier-profile-susanhewitt

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On this IdentiFriday Eve, I am working on Martha’s Vineyard – ascending order, as I always do. Lately, I have been jonesing to get back to my childhood home of Rhode Island, and it pleases me that I can remember so many taxa even after being away for decades.

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Is it Friday already? I’ve been out in the field so much this week, I’ve lost track of the days.

But today I don’t have to be anywhere at any particular time (well, except for setting the moth trap this evening), so I’m committing to doing at least 100 IDs of Needs ID observations in New England. I’ll come back and tell you all how long that takes.

ETA: Oops, I went way over 100 IDs. After 26 minutes, I had made 275 IDs. A lot of Queen Anne’s Lace, some Buttonbush and Pickerelweed, some Blue Vervain, and random other easy-to-ID species.

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How do you eat an elephant (IDs on iNat) ?
One bite at a time.
It’s like carding wool. Pick out the burrs. Comb up and down, then left to right.

My Needs ID for the Cape Peninsula is daunting. This morning’s bite was 500 birds, sorted from the oldest first. The residue that the birders couldn’t or wouldn’t (too blurry for more than It’s A Bird!)
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/identify?per_page=10&iconic_taxa=Aves&order_by=observed_on&order=asc

After a few uncomfortable conversations with identifiers about my housekeeping for the observers

  1. Duplicate - please delete

  2. Duplicate - please combine

  3. Multiple species - please separate

I now consistently use - Life - Good as it can be - to get it out of Unknowns, and keep the comments targeted at the (absent?) observer.

Not a birder. I have added annotations
Dead
Egg / juvenile
Feather / scat / track / bone

Found a few where I could add a casting vote.

Once we have nest annotation, I can sweep thru for the half that are weaver’s nests ;~)

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PS encouraging to see that even a simple Lep … larva … for caterpillars, is useful!
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/68613-the-power-of-annotations

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Not sure why you would have uncomfortable conversations with identifiers about that?

I remember one especially annoying class project where multiple students would photograph the same plant from so close to the same angle that you almost couldn’t tell that they were different photographs. As in, if you toggled between them, the only thing that would change is that the leaves would move about one centimeter. As far as I’m concerned, those count as duplicates.

If they were uploaded by different users, they are not duplicates, but if one student uploaded many, then yes.

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Those nearly identical photos by different students certainly feel like duplicates to us identifiers! But of course they’re not. And each student probably values his or her own. Sigh. At least the identification goes fast after the first one is identified.

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Uncomfortable because
different workflows
and I realised we were talking at cross purposes.
But I thought …
I’ve tried to make it tidier for all 3 sides.