Most endangered birds you've seen as of august 2021

Type in the most endangered birds you’ve seen as of August 2021.

For me,
All are near-threatened (except for the common ones)

Alexandrine parakeet (Psittacula eupatria):
Habitat loss and bird trade/poaching

Malabar Pied Hornbill (Anthracoceros coronatus):
Habitat degradation, urbanization, forest fires and habitat fragmentation

Black-headed Ibis (Threskiornis melanocephalus), Oriental Darter (Anhinga melanogaster):
Drainage and pollution, destruction of nesting sites, and hunting of eggs and chicks.

Painted Stork (Mycteria leucocephala):
Drainage and pollution, destruction of nesting sites and habitat, hunting of eggs and chicks, and hybridization with invasive storks

Woolly-necked Stork (Ciconia episcopus):
Drainage and pollution, destruction of nesting sites and habitat, hunting of eggs and chicks

Black-Tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa):
Urbanization, hunting and trapping, fire and water management, agriculture, transportation accidents/borders, intrusion, non/native species, climate change

It has practically every problem a bird can have, and considering it has one of the biggest ranges of any seabird, this makes it top on my list.

In my country, only some rare restricted endemics are any more than vulnerable.

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Kinda long to type by myself what are the causes, so I’ll link IUCN pages, to shorten the list here’re only species considered vulnerable globally, haven’t seen any endangered species yet:
Greater Spotted Eagle (Clanga clanga) rare and hates humans
Yelkouan Shearwater (Puffinus yelkouan) probably in the same boat as all pelagics
Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) which isn’t really rare
European Turtle-dove (Streptopelia turtur)
Eastern Imperial Eagle (Aquila heliaca) also locally common species
Great Bustard (Otis tarda) kinda same
Velvet Scoter (Melanitta fusca) with decreasing trend, but as you see, big population
Horned Grebe (Podiceps auritus) locally a normal common bird found in pretty much each suitable water body
Common Pochard (Aythya ferina) with weirdest status of all of them, super common bird

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Sadly, none. All the birds I see are fairly common. Which, perhaps, is a good thing.

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Whooping Crane. I see them a few times a year, every year.

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Andean condor (poaching and human conflict), and great white heron (habitat loss)

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These are the IUCN Red List Critically Endangered (CR) Birds:

Regent Honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia)

https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22704415/130992272
https://ebird.org/species/reghon1/

Ruppell’s Griffon (Gyps rueppelli)

https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22695207/118595083
https://ebird.org/species/ruegri1/

Hooded Vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus)

https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22695185/118599398
https://ebird.org/species/hoovul1/

White-headed Vulture (Trigonoceps occipitalis)

https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22695250/118632735
https://ebird.org/species/whhvul1/

Waved Albatross (Phoebastria irrorata)

https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22698320/132641638
https://ebird.org/species/wavalb/

Black Stilt (Himantopus novaezelandiae)

https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22693690/129560535
https://ebird.org/species/blasti1

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I’ve seen island jays a few times, which aren’t threatened by habitat loss as much as they are just confined to one single island (granted it’s a large one) off of California.

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The most endangered I’ve seen is probably the California Condor, Gymnogyps californianus. I’ve seen them a few times, but one time there was one that was perched on a rock very close and I happened to have a good camera with me.

Also been fortunate enough to see some White-backed Vulture, Gyps africanus, and some Rüppell’s Griffons, Gyps rueppelli.

There are other CR species I’ve seen, but haven’t gotten a photo.

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The most endangered possible- formerly ‘extinct’ and both now critically endangered (but improving!)
South Island Takahē- at Tāwharanui and Tiritiri Matangi
New Zealand Storm Petrel- on trips out to Pokohinu and Aotea

For anyone from or visiting Aotearoa NZ, they both are readily available opportunities to see probably the rarest and most unique bird you’ll ever see

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Northern subspecies of Spotted Owls! Even more endangered after 2021 fires have wiped out much of their remaining habitat in California and Canada is chopping down the old growth forest where there last pair of birds is…

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California Condors. And the very last Whooping Crane that was part of a failed experimental group that wintered in New Mexico with Sandhill Cranes.

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I have seen black headed ibis flying in group and also house sparrow, they are endangered in India

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I’ve seen a lot of rare bird species. Many of them are endemic to Western Ghats.
Egyptian Vulture, White-rumped Vulture, Indian Vulture, Steppe Eagle, Greater Spotted Eagle,
Indian Spotted Eagle, Rufous bellied Eagle, Lesser Fish Eagle, Legge’s Hawk Eagle, Nilgiri Pipit, Palani Laughingthrush, White bellied Sholakili, Nilgiri Wood pigeon, Malabar Grey Hornbill, Great Hornbill, Spot billed Pelican etc.
Some are locally very common like Painted stork, Black headed Ibis, Oriental Darter etc

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From October 2020 to February 2021: Mindoro Hornbill (taxa/5492-Penelopides-mindorensis); endemic and endangered (IUCN and DENR). A pair of them staying close to my house. I could observe almost daily fly-overs and record the calls of the male.

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I saw some California Condors while hiking in the Pinnacles a several years ago. I was surely impressed with how big and husky they look. Despite the bulk, they soared effortlessly around the Stoney outcrops. I don’t know if I have a picture, but I will look.

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And yes I have also seen Indian hornbill, he has a loud and majestic sound, I knew this bird was different just by hering him for the seconds, but crows looted all the fun by attacking the bird and then the bird flew away. that was my first hornbill I have seen with my naked eyes, sadly I can’t click the photo.
I wonder how we know wheather bird is endangered or not, we just notice when birds starting diappearing.

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It’s done by studying in different areas, for migrating species on hotspots of migration and as normal strategy - counting breeding pairs, when scientists gather information for many years, decades and more, they can see population trends and estimate population numbers.

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Darn it, at the time it was this out-of-nowhere blue-and-yellow macaw I observed in North Florida (apparently it’s someone’s pet that flies around), but since then it’s been downgraded from Endangered to Least Concern. So for now it’s the sandhill cranes I observed (although they were migrating through Georgia so I don’t think the conservation status counts), and this Cooper’s hawk (apparently Vulnerable in Georgia, nonmigratory however).

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And I think INAT also help in this data collection

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I have only seen Painted Stork and Black headed Ibis near the lakes. There are very few clean lakes in the place where I stay.

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