Pale Corydalis Growing Conditions

How many of you have spotted Pale Corydalis (found in the forests of eastern North America) growing in mesic conditions? Personally I have only seen it growing out of rock crops. Apparently it does very well following a disturbance and then diminishes in numbers as the years pass which I think is true because I generally only find one or two plants. I wrote an article about it if you are interested to see my take on this plant. Otherwise I look forward to your responses!
https://njurbanforest.com/2020/09/30/plants-of-new-jersey-17-pale-corydalis/

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I have never seen this plant in the wild, although it is one of my favorites! I call it Rock Harlequin, however. Thanks for the article!

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Glad you enjoyed it! Yes, Rock Harlequin is another name for Pale Corydalis.

I assume this is the same as Corydalis sempervirens? (That’s what my field guide calls it.) I’ve seen it growing wild around here, but only on rock outcrops. I like to keep the exact locations obscured since some folks I know who are rare plant collectors were a tad too excited about it and wanted to know exactly where to find it. I don’t know if this is truly a concern with this species but the locations were on National Park territory anyway where collecting even seeds without a permit is a no-no.

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Your post title caught my eye because I’ve seen Pale Corydalis (Corydalis flavula) in varying conditions and rather frequently. But I see in reading the article and replies that you mean Capnoides sempervirens. I don’t memorize the binomial names, but this is one of those reasons why we use them. So many things share common names. Now I want to see Capnoides sempervirens. The observation closest to me is in a rocky area in a river.

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In some states the plant is considered rare.

Common names can be confusing!