What is(are) your dawn chorus species?

Recently came up in discussion with a few friends scattered around the world and it was fascinating hearing all the different species that they associate with waking up- doves, gulls, cicadas, car sirens…

What species do you most associate with your mornings and dawn chorus where you are?

For me, presently living in south Texas it is the mourning dove.
Previously in Auckland region it was kererū and tūī, and any different field site worked it’s been something totally different.

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Usually either hooded crows or herring gulls (or both). And our house cat, but I guess that doesn’t count! :D

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White throated sparrow.

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I’m in NYC so Homo sapiens :slightly_smiling_face:

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We hear cardinals, blue jays, chickadees, robins, mourning doves, hairy/downy woodpeckers, nuthatches and in spring, the passing migrant. We have a long winter here and our summers can get hot and humid so the windows are closed a lot either for the furnace or air conditioner. It’s a joy when I can keep them open. The blue jays like to function as a loud early alarm clock but I don’t mind since they’re so fun to have in the yard (we can have family/groups of up to 5-8 who roam the neighborhood). In the spring, an unfamiliar call/song can wake me from my sleep. “What was that?” and I’m up at looking out the window.

Unfortunately, we live close to busy-ish urban artery street and the airport so, often, the first sound we hear are the planes taking off once quiet hour is over or a bus picking up its early passengers. When the state shut down for quarantine, it was wonderfully quiet for the first time in decades.

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Seasonal: winter - distant homo sapiens (car sound) - windows are closed, spring - Fringilla coelebs and Parus major and Homo sapiens, first half of summer - predominant screech of Turdus pilaris, with occasional solos of Phoenicurus ochruros, Motacilla alba and Sturnus vulgaris in nice harmony with cars, second part of the summer- Delichon urbicum and cars.

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The air conditioner, and our housecat.

If the window is open such that I can hear birdsong, there is no morning chorus, but when I do hear a bird, it’s often a mourning dove. Or sometimes a Blue Jay screaming.

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Oooh what fun question! I am currently working on marsh surveys in SE Idaho and so I get to spend every morning with dozens of species of birds. The most distinctive sounds are the croaking of the Sandhill Cranes and the almost obnoxious sounds of the many duck species!

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Don’t usually wake up that early, but first things I hear when I wake up would be northern cardinals, and other songbirds whose sounds I don’t recognize (I’m sure American robins and carolina wrens are there somewhere), along with the sound of passing cars.

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I’m in southeast Texas. I get Carolina wrens and cardinals for my dawn chorus. I most associate the wrens though because they are much louder and closer to my window so they often wake me up. :smile:

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It used to be crows but for the last 4-5 years non native native nanday parakeets wake me up. They are very loud but I love them. There are maybe only 3-5 in the neighborhood but they are loud enough that it sounds like dozens.

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I’ve had an American robin in my neighborhood the past couple springs that absolutely delights in singing at top volume from the neighbor’s roof at dawn. Other than that, blue jays sometimes (often at dusk) and northern cardinals particularly in late spring. I’m not often awake at dawn, but that’s typically what I hear when I am (or what wakes me up). :)

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Depending on season, white-winged doves, house finches, and house sparrows, and the kekking call of Cooper’s hawks.

EDIT: Forgot to mention our backyard chickens.

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The screech of blue jays or the coos of feral pigeons.

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The sounds that I prefer to hear are chickadees, cardinals, jays, ect. The sound I sometimes hear is raccoons attempting to chew holes in the house. The first one I get to lay there and enjoy, the second I have go out and run off, exactly what I want to do at 4 am.

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There’s this bird that sits in the oak tree outside my window and does this really annoying trill at 4am. Thing is I’ve heard it multiple times but I’ve never actually seen it. It’s a monotone, loud, fast-paced chipchipchipchipchipchipchipchipchipchip

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American Robins usually start in around 3 to 4 AM and then mostly it’s Northern Cardinals I notice. The silence in winter is beyond depressing so I sleep in some times as late as 6.

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Living in south Texas, I hear mourning doves and house sparrows along with mockingbirds.

Before sunrise: Ornate chorus frogs
Sunrise: Styan’s bulbuls
After sunrise: the monk Barbet

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I was headed out when I posted the original reply and didn’t have time for the context.

I grew up in northern Ontario and the song of white throated sparrows and the smell of white pine have always been associated, in my mind, with being home. I lived for many years in places where neither existed and when I would visit the first whiff of pine and the sparrows singing as I opened my eyes in the morning was a religious experience. The place I live now is a long way from the places I grew up but there are lots of white pine and white throated sparrows are common. They still make me feel all warm and fuzzy.

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