Wildlife misidentification/misuse in ads or television

I think this has been discussed before. I could not find the previous post. There was a post about red-tailed hawks’ calls being used for eagles on TV.

I saw this ad on Facebook today. Insect people will immediately see the problem. Tiger beetles are predatory insects. They are no threat to plants. They will prey on insects that could harm your plants.

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For birds in tv/film it is significant to remember the Migratory Bird Treaty Act does legally prohibit accurate birds for many ‘roles’ set in the USA, so even if they do attempt to be accurate they may not legally be able to- explicitly for the purpose of protecting these species.

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You could report the ad as misleading to Facebook. I doubt it would do much, but if multiple people did who knows?

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If you feel the need to conjure up some angry emotions, check out this article. Not only is it completely scientifically-inaccurate and considerably inhumane, many of these practices are illegal (at least throughout much of the U.S.) with some serious repercussions from wildlife agencies. I hate to be the person to share this, but it’s mind-blowing this way of thinking persists and y’all might want to know about “Garden Store Herpetology…”

https://www.solutionsstores.com/how-to-get-rid-of-salamanders#:~:text=We%20suggest%20laying%20out%20glue,keep%20them%20off%20your%20property.

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Whoever wrote that should be sprayed with insecticide and stuck to a glue board!

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The FB ad is probably an intern told to find a picture of a bug and that metallic beetle ticks the pretty box.
Reporting to FB is pointless … we find nothing wrong with this.

Gardening for biodiversity, with nature, is not mainstream.

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Wow, I stopped raking my yard in the fall specifically to encourage the salamander population there. If someone has an entirely opposite article with better tips, feel free to let me know!

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oh goodness no, I’m not going to give them any traffic so they get ad money or whatever! besides, I’m already aware there’s a gross amount of environmental misinformation and lack of education, I don’t need to read this kind of article to make myself extra sad…

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Someone related:

I remember, years ago, perhaps while visiting Alabama or somewhere in the East, I saw a commercial, where a group of men found some bears (CGI, probably?) ransacking their campground, and so they chased them out. It was a truck commercial, maybe with the idea that the type of man who drives that type of truck can fight bears. (There was a disclaimer: don’t try this at home)
It was surprising to me, because after living in Montana, bears were a real part of life and a real source of daily precaution. I think that for most people in the US, they are basically like dragons—a mythical animal for fairy tales, but not something people would worry about encountering.

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Some years ago, in Australia, there was an ad for paint with two crows talking to one another about the benefits of this particular paint. The problem was that they used Pied Crows (an African species) for the crows. Perhaps it was a South African ad firm?

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We constantly have translation issues in old or cheap nature documentaries, e.g. gannets are always translated as cormorants. How to translate “kite” is a mystical thing, so they’re called with any bird name translator knows. Same goes for tv series, Midsomer murders had an episode with Harris’s hawk and how was it called here? A falcon for sure!
image

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Never heard our crows discussing paint …

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Don’t forget the “Blue-crested Hoopoe”!

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I made a comment similar to what I entered here: “Tiger beetles are predatory insects. They are no threat to plants. They will prey on insects that could harm your plants.”

All the other comments were how bad poisons were for the environment. I am guessing that the ad was targeted at people who used the word “plant” or “tree”. But, those were probably observers of nature and not people in gardening groups.

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Can’t they notice something is wrong here?

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I think there are many problems here haha.

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Oh wow :joy:

That’s cute! It almost looks like a stuffie toy. Perhaps they wanted people to associate bees with stuffed animals for a happy association?

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it’s not even a bee though… there are plenty of fluffy bees already…

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I can’t remember what organisation it is, they are based in South Africa and are quite esteemed in training wildlife workers and professionals. However their logo, an animal track, which one would expect to be of an indigenous wild animal, is actually that of a domestic dog
I can only guess this was done for mass appeal :/

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