Animal's native status in iNat contradicts the "about" section provided and surrounding Places of Interest

I don’t know if this is a bug or not, but I just noticed that Brown Recluse spiders are called “non-native” in Indiana and Illinois.


However, it’s listed as endemic in every single surrounding state (Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, Missouri, and Iowa) AND the wiki article provided by iNat specifically lists Illinois and Indiana as the Brown Recluse’s range while also saying it’s never established outside of its native range.

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This isn’t a bug, it just means that a user listed it as introduced to Illinois. The process for doing that can be explained by someone more knowledgeable than me.

Here’s a map of their distribution that seems to show them as native to Illinois: https://bugguide.net/node/view/33527. However, Loxosceles reclusa is a synanthrope–it has adapted readily to humans and is rarely found away from human structures. Its native range may be more narrow. I haven’t found any sources that try to determine the original native range of this species.

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From the status tab on the species page you can click View next to the various places. Then you can edit the establishment means on the checklist entries.
https://www.inaturalist.org/listed_taxa/2900150
https://www.inaturalist.org/listed_taxa/2957770

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See https://help.inaturalist.org/en/support/solutions/articles/151000176171-how-to-add-or-edit-establishment-means-in-inaturalist

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I don’t think I’m going to edit it myself just because I really don’t know the native range, but if I were to edit it would I mark it as “Endemic” or just “Native?” It’s supposedly endemic to the US and it would supposedly be in it’s endemic range in Indiana and Illinois, but it isn’t endemic specifically to Indiana or Illinois

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It seems weird that someone would mark it as non native to Indiana and Illinois, which seem to be considered its native range in multiple websites, but leave it be in Wisconsin and Michigan where it seems even more debatable. I’m not accusing anyone of doing anything wrong, maybe someone was in Illinois and someone else in Indiana and each just noticed it was labeled as endemic when they thought it shouldn’t have been, it’s just awkward now that the “native” range looks like it has a random two-state hole punched out of it on iNat

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