Earlier than normal flowering

In SE Pennsylvania this winter has been exceptionally warm and I have noticed some observations of very early flowering. Does anyone have an iNaturalist project to record this?

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I don’t know of a project for early flowering, but you can annotate the observations with “flowering” and it will show up in the phenology graphs built into the website.

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You can start a project

I found only this tightly focused one
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/pyoli-an-early-spring-flower-phenology?tab=about

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Not to derail the subject - is it possible to view this by country/region?
For example, many species are active much earlier in southern Spain than the rest of europe, and a visitor/outsider may be confused by that.
It would be nice to view that data more specefic to that a locality.

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yes. The phenology charts on any given taxon page will respond to the place filter you enter

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Oh I wish that info was spelt out in mouseover text! I was deliberating over North and South hemispheres.
My default is no place filter since I ID across Africa - that explains why my March lilies ‘bloom’ in September, in CA. Phenology is not useful if it includes all the places everywhere.

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Dozens of flowering trilliums have been observed in the U.S. between 1 Jan and 6 Feb 2024 (the earliest so far was recorded on 15 Jan). In the southeastern U.S., dozens of new-growth trilliums were observed in Dec 2023. The earliest budding trillium was observed in Florida on 17 Dec 2023.

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Here’s a tutorial for using the Identify page to quickly annotate observations: https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/using-identify-to-annotate-observations/1417

For what it’s worth, iNat data have been used to try and model plant phenology, eg in this paper [PDF] about anomalous Yucca flowering.

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I could be wrong, but I think it would only really be doable by making it area and species specific. This is definitely something I’ve noticed among native and nonnative species alike though.