Follow up / revisiting prior observations: Suggestions & tips?

I’d like to see if my prior observations (eg, specific plants, taken 1y ago) are still alive.

I’d like to be able to document (using photos) how my observations change over time.

Any tips on how to do this?

Eg: I use the Explore map to walk to the location of a previous observation…but what should I do from there? Should I create a “new” observation at the “same” location? (GPS accuracy is +/- 3.2m to +/- 8m…a degree of inaccuracy that causes some observations to incorrectly “overlap” or even switch places on the map).

I’d really like to attach photo updates to the initial observation when I revisit it (with a date/time stamp being prominently shown in the photo reel), including whether it was dead or alive at the time.

In my opinion, it doesn’t make sense to create two independent observations (and thus, record two slightly different GPS positions) when you revisit the same ‘static’ individual a year later.

Keen to hear comments. If there is an easier way of doing this, please let me know :)

Thank you,

j-k

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If I wanted to maintain the same GPS I’d use the browser feature to duplicate the old observation, add my new photos to the new obs with the different date, and indicate in the description or with an observation field that it’s “linked” to another observation.

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E.g., “Similar Observation Set,” or “Linked Observation” work well for this. And yes, you’ll definitely want to make new observations for this.

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When you revisit, make a new observation and link to the old. I think @bouteloua’s suggestion to duplicate the old observation and then substitute in the new photos is a good way to handle that jumping latilong problem.

EDIT: See @pisum’s important point below.

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Duplicate the obs, then add Similar Observation Set field. Got it, thank you

i think it’s worth noting that in the duplicate observation, the original photos should be removed by clicking Edit and then unchecking the photos in the media section of the Edit screen. if instead you click on the “i” button on a photo and then delete the photo, you’ll delete the photo from both the duplicate and the original observation.

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My goodness! That’s important.

Would this be appropriate to use for something such as a series of observations of toads in the same pond during the year? e.g. adults in spring, tadpoles, juvenile toads.

Slightly off topic I know but hopefully close enough.

Yes, absolutely.