Give me your big bois

Okay so we’re firmly in mud season in Ohio and I think I’m going a little crazy. See, I ran across this absolute T H I C C unit of an oak that’s probably been here since the American Revolution (seriously this thing is like, ten feet in diameter, which is massive even accounting for it having two trunks - this may be a slight exaggeration but seriously I’m bringing a ruler next time I’m on this trail.)

It got me feeling a desire deep in my mud-covered heart that I wanted to see your chonky bois. Y’all got any squirrels that got too deep in the bird feeder? Seals that have have been chowing down on a fresh fish buffet? Maybe big squishy mushrooms that are unreasonably large? I just want to see them. See your big bois to give us some joy while us poor people in midwest wait out the rest of winter.


https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/148781389
Seriously. I’m mad that this was a solo hike so I could get a proper perspective shot.

But yeah. Its muddy and windy and everything is brown. Please bring some needed dopamine to this mildly crazy midwesterner

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This is by far the biggest Loblolly I’ve seen. There’s probably very few pines greater than 150 years old in Northeast Texas, but I’m willing to bet this is one of them

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/108695685

Some better views of its height


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Goodness, you know its a tall tree when you basically have to take a vertical panorama to get the entire thing in shot

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You may enjoy this male Sierran Tree Frog. While not large in stature, he clearly thinks very highly of himself. He has a firm amplexus (mating grip) on a gravid female California Newt who is not only several times his size, but also highly toxic.

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I love them so much. And I mean, really, large I feel is a state of mind, and this definitely exemplifies it.

I feel like this pic is a candidate for Ignore the Walrus, if you haven’t seen that project before

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Double your upright prairie coneflower
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/125547486

King of the road
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/84062288

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There’re many big trees I’ve seen, but the biggest birch (Betus pendula) is one still growing on our dacha, I’m still confused on when exactly it was planted, 60+ years for sure, so it long stopped growing up, but still is getting wider.
https://maps.app.goo.gl/FVYPXmabQpiQPGgj8

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Here’s my largest moth and largest mushroom!

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I could have sworn I made an observation of this American Sycamore tree, but can I find it? No, so you’ll have to make do with @adamkohl’s observation: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/99031567

So big it gets its own Wikipedia entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buttonball_Tree

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This garden friend claimed his sweet spot on one particular branch during butterfly migration and soon thereafter began to look like this. We named him Puff, because his new enhanced physique made him look like he was wearing a cream puffer vest.

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What I assume are gravid western forest scorpions: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/3536456 and https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/3162515

And a likely gravid solifugid: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/96195955 With a blacklight you can see her digestive system straining against her exoskeleton.

Oh, and a pretty good sized giant sequoia with my dad for scale. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/140108918

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Now if you want to see a G I A N T sequioa… there are four people in this picture:

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I was really noticing mormon crickets this summer. Even though they are a small animal, they are CHONKY for a “cricket”. I always think they are BIG when I see them.

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/130681909

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Cirsium vulgare/Bull Thistle

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that pollen!
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/84503295

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I’m jealous of those big trees! I love the huge trees of the pacific northwest, but I’ve always found a towering deciduous like an American Chestnut or an Elm much more enamouring, probably because they’re all but gone where I live (we have tall trees but no thick ones).
The first observation of mine that came to mind these bad boys. Also, just hippos in general.
Honorable mentions to this chubby robin, this fat crocodile. this cat, these leafcutter ants and this borb.

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This Helianthus petiolaris from my garden

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Lucanus cervus is the largest beetle in Europe. Here’s my largest specimen (64 mm):
(https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/148179958)

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I have a couple!

This basketball-sized (more or less) eastern gray squirrel:
image
(https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/141947186)

This giant male Sericopelma tarantula:


(https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/131465338)

This massive Rothschildia moth:


(https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/131501707)

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Not quite as impressive as the giant sequoias, but these old growth tulip trees in Great Smoky Mountains National Park are pretty impressive, too. To top it off, like the sequoias this family of species has been around since the age of the dinosaurs.

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