Inconspicuous roommates

House centipede this morning, some spiders in the laundry room last night, and a mouse nest when moving a bookshelf for some painting this afternoon.

Made me wonder, what’s your total observation count for your home and what are some of your favorite ‘home visitor’ stories?

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Conspicuous visitor: GIANT spider. In my bathtub. Of course.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/125770335

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I’ve had a good deal of interesting roommates - the highlights were a Charinus pesotti, Giant Grasshopper and a Brush Tarantula

https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/109871410
https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/128428390
https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/132919886

Other interesting insects in and around the house
https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/120292988
https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/127346274
https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/130588176
https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/130477985
https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/136144617

some birds
https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/133574675
https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/110282727
https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/130588178

and, much to my surprise, a flatworm!
https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/observations/124027023

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There are many but flying squirrels in the attic are pretty special. So many people hate them, but I think it’s comforting to hear them scuttling around. I imagine it’s as close as I’ll get to living in an old-growth oak tree.

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Wow.

You know, if you ever wanted to join the HomeExchange vacation service, I bet you would have no trouble finding iNat members to swap with.

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You can submit animals found in your home to this project: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/never-home-alone-the-wild-life-of-homes
Here are my observations in the project: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?captive=any&order_by=observed_on&place_id=any&project_id=24237&user_id=lappelbaum&verifiable=any
I definitely have more than I just haven’t uploaded to iNat yet.

Former beloved roommate (I moved) https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/7144164
Scaley visitors to my current home who got put outside https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/109094191 https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112892520
Super inconspicuous https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/88255326
Super tiny https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/9720065

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Not actually from my home, but a couple of interesting things in different field houses I’ve lived in:

Mostly moths! But I remember this silver-washed fritillary with special fondness: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/126713824. This surprise road-trip companion too: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/107452019

Others:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/127313471
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/122977941
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/125852290
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/118377933
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/134339960
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/134313351
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/133999200

The first time I ever saw a flying squirrel it was trapped behind the microwave cart in my kitchen.

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I’ve got many. The most common are cellar spiders, sac spiders, carpet beetles, clothes moths, pill bugs and woodlice, and so, so many others.

One time, we had a bumble bee enter our basement. It didn’t fly around, just sat on the floor. I took it outside and expected that would be the end of it. However, in the coming days, the bee would return! It was the same non-flying one. A bit confused, I moved it outside again. And guess what? It came back! I don’t know how but it did! When I brought it outside the third time, that was it. It finally left us alone.

In the opposite end of the house, we have a family of European Starlings living the attic. They’ve been there since I can remember. Every year, they lay eggs and create so a lot of noise. Also poo, they love to poo all over our window.

Once I got to see one of the fledglings in our backyard!

Too many: Tineola bisselliella, Drosophila repleta, Steatoda castanea, Steatoda grossa, Pholcus ponticus, Lepisma saccharina, Lachesilla pedicularia, Apanteles carpatus, Attagenus smirnovi, Dorypteryx domestica, Dermestes lardarius once, soetimes small Psychodinae just come out of nowhere, probably from neighbouring flats through the pipes. Plus all the one-timers that get through the window to die later.

I regret not observing it now, but I found a Black Widow behind my refrigerator about a month ago. It was very dried up (which kind of makes me sad tbh), but there’s no telling how long she was there.

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A couple of years back a house sparrow flew into my living room like a hand grenade and crashed into a cupboard and got injured. We looked after him and once we released him, he lived in the garden for a couple of weeks then he suddenly disappeared. I regret not taking a photo because house sparrows are fairly rare in the UK.

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Here are some of my observations of animals that got into my house (or friends house)
Your contributions to Never Home Alone: The Wild Life of Homes · iNaturalist

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@animalobserverdeniz321 Looks like you included some that are on your windowsill or just outside the house (the bee on the flowers). You are only supposed to add obs to this project if they are literally inside the house.

I feed birds on my windowsill. There was one wren that would step through the window to the sill on the inside if we weren’t fast enough getting out the mealworms. I didn’t post any of these photos because I thought I shouldn’t encourage people to do this. One time he snuck in when the window was open just a crack and flew in the house landing on a ledge by the sky lights. I was too concerned about getting him back out to think to take a photo. We got him back to the window by opening it the rest of the way which causes a squeak which is the birdy dinner bell and then putting mealworms on the outside sill.

Edit: One time we had a treefrog make it quite a ways into the house. Found him in a corner very dehydrated and covered in pet fur and hair. Once again I was too concerned to think to take a photo. I put him in a bowl (extra pet water bowl) of well water (no chlorine) to let him rehydrate then delicately removed the hair that he was tangled in.

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Just the regular spiders, flies, pill bugs, and the occasional earwig make their way into my home.
The most noteworthy incident I can recall was when a wasp (either yellowjacket or european paper wasp, I didn’t get a great look) flew in through the open backyard door.
My mom tried using a tennis racket to get it down from the nook above the door, but it wasn’t working, so she used a spray bottle instead, after which I took it outside and it flew off later on.
We found out a week later that we had a wasp infestation below the windowsill on the second floor. :sweat_smile:

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Hard to say how many observations I have from my home as they’re not in a collection/project and a few that I’ve posted are at a broad taxonomic level that makes them hard to go back and find. Here are my favorites (two spiders, an isopod, and two insects):

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/127083484 (Anahita fauna; 너구리거미)
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/36431373 (Scytodes thoracica; 아롱가죽거미)
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/129420923 (Genus Porcellionoides; 굴뚝양쥐며느리속)
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/93012296 (Statilia maculata; 좀사마귀)
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/32874556 (Maiestas dorsalis; 번개매미충)

On our last coastal project, in Manabi… in just the property of our rental… we encountered geckos, iguanas on the roof/fence/trees, giant spiders, never-ending armies of woodlouse, small spiders, medium spiders, spiders in the coffeemaker, spiders in the bed, spiders in the shower, spiders in the bananas, scorpions in the bathrooms, vultures and snail kites dropping, eating and fighting over giant african snails on the roof, blue-gray tanagers trying to enter the place through the windows, beetles of different varieties, a family of pigs breaking into the trash, finally on one of our last days there, my partner found a mouse in inhabiting of my shoes.

I’m probably forgetting a few instances, I wonder if I should’ve better documented the excursion, but to be real, it’s a bit more fun in retrospect, thank goodness I’m visiting during the dry season next time I work in the area.

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Memories of the Dominican Republic. I saw so much wildlife inside the converted storage shed I was living in. Huntsman spiders preyed on geckos, geckos of equal size tried unsuccessfully to cannibalize each other, and when it rained at night, the whole place filled with flying termites. Most mornings there would be a few moths who had come in for shelter and would leave later.

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@lappelbaum I didn’t realise that until I read your message thank you for letting me know I will remove those photos.

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