Monitoring gardens and spreading the message

I take pictures of the wildlife in our little garden and I use the keyword “Garten”. When I search the keywords/description section for “Garten” I get also species that include “Garten” in their common name. Is there a way to organize the observations from my garden in a better way ?

I obscure all my garden observations and none of the other ones in my state, so I use that to filter. Many people have projects set up, either location or keyword based I think.

Thank you Tony, I was not aware of this tread. :)
I feel proud of my garden diversity, since is really quite small, it started back in 2015, when we moved to this house.

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You should be proud! It’s great to find so much diversity in a small space and hopefully more friends or neighbors are interested and start doing the same. It will never replace large scale conservation, but our gardens can be a mini wildlife refuge.

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Don’t forget to tell interested people, to avoid/reduce “fumigacion” which is very popular in Mexico.
Although, we had a little garden in Mexico City we almost had no wildlife due to the insecticide (which apparently killed everything alive, except the “alacranes”). Most of the time, I didn’t allow the fumigator to enter house and garden, but our neighbors found ways to get our garden sprayed indirectly.

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That is awful. Environmental exposure to breathing in insecticide too.

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That sounds very illegal.

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Found my 100th yard Lepidoptera tonight https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/121974443 which makes it the first major wild “group” to hit triple digits. Not the most exciting moth, but it beats identifying Noctuidae.

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I walked outside for lunch break (working from home) and the insect swarms are incredible. So many wasps and bees especially, one of the perks of sunny summer days.

What are y’all seeing? Anything new or exciting?

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Lots of moths, spent each summer of my childhood here and never noticed how many of them are here.

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First time posting so I hope this works. I live in Loveland, Colorado. After letting our mostly bluegrass front lawn die last year, we installed a native plant garden on 2/3 and a native buffalo grass/blue grama lawn on the other third. We planted three native trees, several shrubs and many plains and foothills species. As I am mostly a plant person, I make INat obervations in nearby open spaces, parks, trails and the National Forest. Observations of plants in gardens cannot be elevated to research grade as they are not naturally occurring.

What I plan on doing in my garden is making phenology observations. This is something I was doing on a property I used to own which was several acres, and on two Native plant gardens that are nearby. I use Budburst, www.budburst.org as it allows you to add new species. Nature’s Notebook is another great website, but not as flexible as you can’t add new plants. For us in the Mountain West, many of our iconic and common species are not listed on Nature’s Notebook. But they have lots of resources and tutorials on how to make observations, which Budburst is not as good at. Budburst is international in scope, but Nature’s Notebook is limited to the US.

Here are the links: Budburst https://budburst.org/
Nature’s Notebook https://www.usanpn.org/natures_notebook

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Native grasses and flowers are the best! Thanks for sharing.

Welcome to the forum. Your project sounds pretty awesome. Do you have pics?

Right now things look pretty sparse. I have pics of landscape in progress. I am taking phots monthly. Some plants have really thrived and others have died. Then of course there is the battle with the rabbits who like to sit over a plant and eat it to the ground. So much for browsing!
Like Admiral Halsey said, “If you don’t have losses you’re not trying hard enough”. I can post some later.

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Today we watched an Egyptian goose escort her 6 goslings to a newly planted bed of daisies at Kirstenbosch. Fenced all round with shadecloth.

This way, where I have made a gap - says mama.

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That sounds identical to what I’ve experienced this year… some tragic losses to overpopulation of rabbits and for some odd reason a vole irruption! I was so excited at first, voles are rather cute and I’d never seen one in my suburban yard. Many plant deaths later, I am no longer excited. :(

One thing we did wrong - we tried “Leaving the leaves” this year and didn’t do any fall yard cleanup for overwintering insects. But this seemed to create the perfect environment for the voles to tunnel through, especially if it got a layer of snow on top. Sadly I don’t think we will be doing that again.
However I must remind myself that we have had some great successes too with our plants maturing. My rain garden is entirely filled in and many plants are blooming for the first time.

You can make a project with a boundary or border at the edge of your yard. I want to, but haven’t figured out hwo that works yet.

One of the issues we have in the US is that some garden stores (Home Depot is a particularly egregious offender) treat all their plants with neonicotinoids. These are incredibly toxic to all insects, and can be absorbed into the plant’s system and extruded out in pollen and nectar. Even seeds treated with the stuff can grow into plants that are deadly to pollinators, and it persists in the soil for ages too.

https://xerces.org/sites/default/files/2018-05/16-023_01_XercesSoc_ExecSummary_How-Neonicotinoids-Can-Kill-Bees_web.pdf

So people end up buying flowers or seeds to plant in “pollinator gardens” which then kill everything that touches them. It’s truly horrifying.

If you or anyone you know wants to plant things to attract the pollinators, make sure they know about this!

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Summer has flown by! Thanks to many pictures, National Moth Week, and decent luck, I’m up to 150 moth species and 175 Lepidoptera at home.

This is the latest lovely Lep Allerastria albiciliatus by Elliott Gordon · iNaturalist (second record for NM)

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Sharing a few thoughts and pictures from an eventful summer in New Mexico Musings from an Albuquerque Pollinator Paradise - Pollinator Web

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