Preparing a botanical trip to Texas' Trans Pecos, end of march or april

I’m planning a botanical trip in Texas around march and / or april .
I’m 70 , and I manage a private botanical Garden near Lyon, France (see my inat’ journal).
For 30 years , I have been dreaming with this book : Benny Simpson, Field Guide to Texas Trees .
I continuously update my program and findings in this article: Preparing a botanical trip to Texas’ Trans Pecos, end of march or april
I found several natters’ by looking in observations, and they answered me.
But I would like to know more naturalists to accompany me on the field. We could tackle places little explored, I don’t want to spend too much time in places very well known like Big Bend National Park.

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@ellen5 @nathantaylor know trans pecos plants

I have severed all relations with the state of Texas. Sorry, can’t help you!

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That sounds like fun! Unfortunately, I doubt I’ll be able to make it work since I’m doing my PhD in Oklahoma. If you’re looking for uncommonly explored areas, you might want to try to find some local botanists, land owners or land managers. That said, there’s still more to discover even on public lands if you know where to look and what to look for (e.g., https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104348673). Probably the least botanically explored areas are along the Rio Grande away from major towns and parks (e.g., Candelaria).

If you’re specifically looking for trees, you’re going to want to stick to the mountains. Most of the accessible places there are generally well explored and at higher elevations. There have been some interesting tree finds in the last few years, but the majority of the most significant finds have been herbaceous plants.

I read the observation of Drymaria axillaris ; what is notable is that since 2019 nobody observed it again ! But the Mariscal Canyon Rim Trail is a difficult trail ! https://www.nps.gov/bibe/planyourvisit/mariscal-rim-trail.htm

Regarding Candelaria, I realize that is the end of the road on US side of the Rio :
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farm_to_Market_Road_170 ;
it is difficult to reach from east or north .
Nearby are the Chinati Mountains , but on this TPWD page it is not clear if the area is forbidden or just not yet equiped with proper trails …
https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/chinati-mountains

2 years ago today, interesting. Only 11 hour drive from my house.

There are reasons for this…

@nathantaylor , you will be glad to know that your mention of Candelaria struck me , and I decided to go. See the travel reference, updated regularly; https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/jmvanel/87520-preparing-a-botanical-trip-to-texas-trans-pecos-end-of-march-or-april Search for “Current program” .
Still in need of company on the field ! I intend a mixture of classical hikes, not too long nor too hot , and little explored and promising places (like Candelaria) , but I will go where you go , compatible with my schedule (flexible).
Also , I’d like to visit an organic farm , and a ranch respectful of environment .

Since december, I have interacted with many local botanists including @pufferchung , @s_k_johnsgard , @joshua_tx ,
I will also contact @bob777 , @alex_abair , The Native Plant Society , Botanical Gardens . Some did not (yet?) answer : @ck2az (El Paso) , @joeysantore , @aidancampos , @nathantaylor .