What is the one organism you wish to see in the new year?

Wild horses and burros in Eastern Sierra, a bobcat, mountain lion, bighorn sheep, golden eagle, and several of the less common hawk species (Swainson’s, sharp-shinned, Goshawk, etc). Major plus if I get photos!!

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Wow, so many things I want to see, world-wide, but I’ll mention a few things in my area (North Carolina, USA) I’d like to see, or see better, in the near future
-Star-nosed mole: occurs in the mountains and coastal plain in this area, but seems to be hard to find. Heck, while I’m at it, I’d like to get a good photo of a living Eastern Mole. I have them in my yard, but I’ve never been able to photograph a live one.
-Pine Barrens Tree Frog: I’ve heard them call, but never seen them. There are LOTS of other southeastern herps on my wish list, such as rainbow snake, pygmy rattler, coral snake, …
-Swainson’s Warbler: I’ve seen it several times, and heard it sing many times, but never gotten a satisfying look.
-Gordonia lasianthus (loblolly-bay): a pretty little southeastern shrub that I’ve always managed to miss. Some other plants I really desire to see and photograph–spider lily (Hymenocalis), Lilium grayi, Spigelia marilandica, …
-generally, learn more about fungi/lichens

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Anything new to me.

I could list dozens of things that I’d love to see, but there is really something special about finding something completely unexpected that is also something you’ve never seen before. For example, if I want to see a specific species of bird and I go to where that species is known to frequent and eventually see it, it isn’t as satisfying as if I’m somewhere I wouldn’t expect to see the bird, I wasn’t specifically looking for it, and poof it shows up. One of my favorite observations of 2017 was an Eastern Newt that showed up on my patio. I’ve never seen a newt in the wild and didn’t even know they existed remotely close to my home, but when I saw that little handsome fella, I was like a kid on Christmas morning.

I wish that feeling of giddiness on everyone!

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I had my one up-close Mountain Lion sighting this way. …Gave “call of nature” a whole new meaning for me!

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I’m going to Morocco this year and there’s one thing I want to see more than anything:

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/36761444

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I would like to learn how to find salamanders. My hiking and photographing style is fairly hands off- even if I know I need multiple angles, I try to do so without disturbing anything if I can help it. Apparently I need to me a bit more aggressive and turn over more logs.

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Tricky question, there are so many! I guess my top 3 would be:
Spiranthes diluvialis
Cypripedium fasciculatum
Galearis rotundifolia
(but not necessarily in that order).

Eastern spotted skunk. I’m desperate!

Edit to add: I also want to find a Venus flytrap in Tennessee again. I found a cluster of them near Nickajack Cave in Southeastern Tennessee in 2008, before I had a smartphone or digital camera, and I really wish I could find them again and document them. As far as I’ve been able to find, no one has ever documented Venus flytraps anywhere in the state.

Lassen County is a good place for badgers. They often appear on trail cams and while not common, we sometimes see them in our larger sagebrush flats and valleys. We do monitor a few goshawk nests during the breeding season, so @birdwhisperer and @scubabruin, if you find yourself up in northeastern CA during the summer send me a note and i may be able to get you to a goshawk.
For me, either genus in the Taracidae (Taracus or Oskoron) observed in Lassen County would be a first, and something i’ve fruitlessly searched for in the county for 3 years now. And, either T. pallipes in California, or T. ubicki in Oregon (which i think would the the easier of the two) would achieve a goal.

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