Earthworms of the Dominican Republic

First let me start by saying that I just created an account on inaturalist not 5 minutes ago and this is my first post so forgive any mistakes in procedure or what have you…

There was an original post on the topic of earthworms in the Caribbean which I will link below…

https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/earthworms-of-the-caribbean/29849?u=thelonewolfshepherd

I’m wondering if anyone has had any experience with techniques or tactics for finding Earthworms :worm: specifically in the Dominican Republic and what are some signs to look for or some specific areas or specific climates to avoid in order to find good earthworms in the Dominican Republic.

Thanks :+1:t2::pray:

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Welcome to iNaturalist! Not sure about the Dominican Republic specifically, but I’ve had luck finding worms in moist, damp places below cover such as logs or pots.

@marianojohnson @mreith Maybe you can help with this

Anything with dirt should have them, look under trash (plastic, cardboard, and wood are good to look under). They like very disturbed areas.

Welcome to iNat. Earthworm taxonomy is pretty exacting, limiting it to the Dominican Republic even more so, but it is through hardworking souls such as yourself that scientific knowledge progresses. Best of luck.

Hi dum1, sorry for the late answer. I am not a regular forum visitor…

I am finding earthworms mainly in gardens, some people (mainly immigrants) do have worm compost bins here with possibly introduced species. As these are considered captive, I did not really bother to document them until now.
Are you aware of a species list of Hispaniolan worms?

The lowest level of a cave (Grotte Dame Marie) in South West Haiti has been called: the lair of the blue worm, by the explorers (Brian Oakes might know more about this). The blue worm they observed in that cave, might be the same unknown species as the one in the following observation:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/98916322

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If the worms are in the compost bins, they would be captive, but if they have escaped the bins and are now living on their own in the surrounding areas they would be wild.