Edit images to help with IDs (e.g. brighten, lower contrast)

A few times while viewing observations to identify I’ve run into a couple of issues, often times images are too dark / contrasty to identify, but then if you download the image and lower the contrast in an editor, it’s quite obvious! and sometimes I’m not able to zoom into images enough, usually due to a strange cropping job and phone photos with the outer field of the image being large compared to the subject…

So it would be great if functions were implemented into iNat for lowering contrast while viewing an image in an observation, and possibly further zooming!

I use GIMP, it takes ages to load, and so often I don’t bother or aim to go back to it later, and often don’t. A slider in the identify image viewer to adjust contrast would be awesome. The zoom in the identifier feels buggy to me, and a “double click to step-zoom” would be cool, kinda like how the map works. Maybe even a “double click to open in an image tool” that allows such tweaking…

Don’t forget to vote for your own feature request!

5 Likes

Can someone provide some specific examples? We actually can adjust brightness and contrast with just CSS, but I’d like to test if the CSS filters will actually achieve something like the outcome you want.

1 Like

We can “open image in new window” which gives ample control of zoom. A sliding control for brightness and/or contrast would be handy… Ideally being able to zoom at the same time. Anything more technical than that would be rare enough to warrant saving and opening in an external editor

1 Like

here’s one of mine: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/20722196. it’s a bird that is lit from the back, making it hard to identify. i just added the last photo, which reduces contrast and bumps up lighting and highlights. i’m not a bird expert, but looking at this latest photo, i think i can see it is some sort of sparrow (chipping?), but maybe not a house sparrow, which was the one ID that one person made.

UPDATE: here’s another backlit bird: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/16062220. as with the other observation, the last photo was just added. this time around, i bumped down contrast and highlights and increased brightness and shadows.

2 Likes

Oh, observation examples! I misunderstood…

https://www.inaturalist.nz/observations/23083155
https://www.inaturalist.nz/observations/13993649

1 Like

Just as a sidebar to this feature request I took one of my own observations, downloaded the original image and edited the brightness/contrast of a section of that image, and uploaded the edit to Blogger, then used that web address to insert the image in a comment.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/7803628#activity_comment_3090834
I know I can just add the edited image to my own observations but I did not want to work on someone else’s observation like this unless it seemed like an okay thing to do.

1 Like

Some Zooniverse projects have image manipulation tools. For example, this one has pan, zoom, rotate, and invert colors. Brightness and contrast would be top of my list though.

1 Like

Just wanted to note that we’re doing a little testing of this on our end.

5 Likes

cool!
Would I be able to save an edited version of my own observation?

No, this would only change how the photo is shown in Identify.

2 Likes

I just noticed it! It’s fantastic, thanks guys!

3 Likes

Yes as @cappinkiwi said, this was deployed today:

Clicking on the plus button will increase brightness and the minus button will lower it. Clicking on the sun icon will revert to original. This doesn’t affect the actual image, just how it’s displayed in your browser.

8 Likes

relatedly, how hard is it to create contrast adjustments like the brightness one? I am thinking like the ‘lux’ adjustment on Instagram. That often can bring out detail. (Edit: Sorry, i didn’t see that the thread was locked)

seems like it should be as easy or hard as it was to do the brightness control. in addition to brightness, css allows you to tweak contrast, saturation, hue, etc.

the brightness thing doesn’t work very well in Edge, but who cares about those guys, right? (they’re all going to be on Chrome at some point anyway.)

1 Like