Most Common Research-Grade Insect/Arachnid/etc. Observations (Maps): Update 6/14 - Multiple New Maps in Comments!

Okay, you fellow map-crazed iNatters! I was worried about filling the forum with a bunch of map posts, but they each individually seem to be generating conversation, some folks are asking for more, and I like doing it - so I’ll keep going for now unless the moderators tell me to stop! :slightly_smiling_face:

I’m thinking about Europe/Canada and also some other taxa, and will probably post some of those maps soon. But for now, here’s another good U.S.A one: Butterflies and Moths (Order Lepidoptera).

Here are links to the other posts/maps so far: (1) USA plants, (2) USA birds, (3) USA fungi/lichen (with a bonus slime mold map in the comments). @jamie-aa also posted an excellent England plants map!

Update, 2024.06.10: Here’s a map that includes Canada! And now there’s a moths-only U.S.A. map in the comments!

Update #2, 2024.06.10: Arachnids.

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Proud of New Mexicans for propelling a moth into first place. Our moth fauna is diverse and understudied … I’m judging by the number of state records and unidentified observations I have, plus a tendency for entomologists to spend time in southeast Arizona instead of southwest New Mexico.

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You should make these into journal posts on your INat profile, they’d be easier to keep track of/locate

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Good suggestion - I think I’ll do that. I originally thought about just posting there, but I figured a lot more people who might appreciate them would come across them here in the forum.

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You should also keep posting them on the forum! And make more too, I absolutely love seeing these!

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Please do Europe, I’m sure there are plenty of us who’d be interested.

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I like that you can see the migration path of the monarch laid out! :)

You should definitely do Canada too, I’d be super interested in that!

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Gulf Fritillaries in Hawaii??!!!?? Must have been introduced via eggs or caterpillars on a passionfruit vine.

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To add to your work: I’d love to learn about “Most UNcommon” (but Research Grade). Might give some insights into how certain species are migrating under climate change. Thanks for doing this work, it’s valued.

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If you mean species with the least number of RG obs, then there would be a whole lot of ties between species with only one observation.

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I’m planning on posting some Canadian maps tonight, then starting on Europe!

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Since there’s a lot of overlap in discussion maybe keeping them in one topic and linking the maps in the first post would be good.

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Really interesting how you can see distinct regions on this one!

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No surprise Washington got the Isabella Tiger Moth – probably mostly larvae, the famous “woolly bears,” which are pretty much everywhere in early fall.

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Yes, that is cool!
But sadly, we should not infer from it that the monarch population is robust. I suspect it is in part, if not largely, due to the fact that monarchs are a charismatic and easily identified species - probably the most easily IDed butterfly in North America.

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“Moths only” would potentially show a bit more diversity I would think. If you are taking requests I’d love to see the exclusion of taxon 47224 (butterflies).

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Fascinating. Thank you!!!

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How would you feel about changing the content - and title - of this thread to a more general ‘Insects and Arachnids’?

I made a map for beetles and thought it might work in this thread if you don’t mind.

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Done!

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