What's in your field kit?

BioQuip.com

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Ooh, bookmarked, thanks for the tip!

A friend told me they can spend hours browsing https://www.sciplus.com/ (aka Jerryco) but BioQuip looks more like my speed.

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When I am just looking for insects in the area to add to my Rite in the Rain logbook, and only collecting if it really sparks my interest, not too much is taken with me.
This is what I usually will take when I am out doing this;

Backpack with water
Towel and extra clothes in case I fall in a pond again
First-Aid Mainly for stings and bites
Waterproof hardback logbook
Pencil or two
Sharpener
A few small brushes
camera
forceps
a few vials
labels
phone
gloves
spade
plastic bags
on occasion, a net

But when I´m out collecting specimens, my list of supplies grows, though most of them are lightweight.
It will also depend on my location.

Backpack with water
Towel and extra clothes
First-Aid
Waterproof hardback logbook
Pencil or two
Sharpener
A few small brushes
camera
forceps
80-100+ vials and containers of varying sizes
labels
phone
gloves
spade
plastic bags
foldable sweep net
dip net
methyl acetate
cotton balls
70% alcohol
non-toxic adhesive
tracking markers/chips
aspirator
ruler
pocket knife
snacks
flashlight
hand warmers
UV light
LED headlamp
Permits
old apple juice as bait
tourniquet - watch out for the not-so-harmless snakes
homemade beat sheet - foldable
floss roles from the dentist - never know when you´ll need between 40 and 125 yards of it!
SONY ICD-B300 - audio logs when at an area for multiple days or weeks at a time,recording unfamiliar insect sounds
laptop
WWII Leather ammunition satchel - from my dad´s step-dad
allergy meds - surprisingly, a lot of plant allergies, only a few beetle allergies(Ocypus olens)
reading glasses
book
whistle
1 can of tuna
2 cans of beans
GPS
fitbit, and charger
pitfall traps
pheromone traps

I am probably forgetting a few items, but overall, that is about it.
Is there anything that you guys think that I should be taking?

Peace out!

-Connor

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“Again” lol - good idea though!

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Yeah, there is a rainwater pond near my old grade school that fills up only if there is enough rainfall over the course of a week or two, or all at once. When I was in kindergarten, my class had a bunch of Pacific tree frogs, and we released them when they were adults at the rainwater pond.
I seem to fall into in a lot when it is as full as it gets(about 2.5 feet at the deepest point) usually when I am either doing a Nerf war with friends, or when I am attempting to capture a specimen.

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I carry in one backpack:
*compressed Sea to Summit ultralight backpack (dedicated for picking up trash),
*point and shoot camera with telephoto and macro capabilities (extra batteries and SD Cards)
*SOL Emergency blanket and bivouac
*whistle
*map of area
*kit of tweezers (to examine tiny things)
*loupe (magnifies micro things
*firestarting kit (ferro rod, flash tinder)
*knife (fixed blade)
*compressible jacket(usually down)
*compressible rain jacket (Frogg tog)
*Headlamp (with extra batteries)
*pens
*notebook
*paracord
*durable container with a lid - usually clear (to get shots of small critters)
*hand sanitizer (doubles as fire starter)
*tanka and Clif bars, fresh or dried fruit or veggie
*Life straw and water bottle
*stick of sunscreen (Trader Joe’s)
*ToGo ware (especially if I brought a salad)
*GoGirl (in its own plastic case with toilet paper, extra bag to pack out used TP, Huggies wipes **nobody wants unclean body or pants)
*hat and sunglasses
*small first aid kit, with mirror
*dump pouch (dedicated to foraging, especially in berry picking season)
Sometimes I take more than one camera and sometimes I take a field guide.
Extended trips include a good hand saw and hammock and extra socks

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I once used a selfie stick that I got from goodwill for observing a bird nest in a tree cavity that was out of reach. It worked wonderfully.
But I love this idea too -

There’s a few bike handle bar phone mounts or even a clip for attaching a phone to a circular object like a binocular lens that could probably be rigged up with a trekking pole/cell phone. Then you’d either need a remote (maybe available on a connected smart watch) or to use the timer function for photographing after the phone is out of reach, or take clips from a video recording initiated before airborne.

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There was an article that car floormats are good for moving snapping turtles off a road. You drag the turtle onto the mat by the back of its shell. (You don’t pull it by its tail which could injure its spine and you especially stay away from the front snapping part.) Then, you drag the mat off the road.

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