Add list of a place's next level children places

I love the community curated places. I’ve been adding the County nature preserves near me. I got the official KML files from the county. So I added a parent place for all of the nature preserves:
https://www.inaturalist.org/places/washtenaw-county-napp-nature-preserves
And have been adding each individual nature preserve.

It’d be great if on the parent place (linked above) all the children (places that list it as a parent), were listed somehow. That way you could have a parent place that groups many children places and more easily navigate to the children places. So you could find a place, and then drill down/explore into the places within the place.

I could understand that some places might have many many children, but it could be displayed in a indexed/paged list.

I’m glad to explain more if needed.

This is kind of what I’m describing, I was able to manually accomplish as a list in a journal post:
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/43456-washtenaw-county-napp-nature-preserves#activity_comment_5743679
Though, my feature request still stands, as this is a workaround but not a solution necessarily.

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regarding workarounds, i’ve seen folks create projects for each place and then group the projects in an umbrella project. this eliminates the need for a parent place, though that method comes with pros and cons.

i’m not aware of a great way for normal users to identify child places. the old API (see https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/api+reference) allows query for places filtering by ancestor places, which might get you the desired result in your case, though i believe there’s not a good way to limit the results generally to immediate children. the other problem is that the old API is deprecated and could be retired at any time.

the final workaround might be to use the list of all places that they recently made available. (see https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/use-wikidata-for-place-names-and-wikipedia-descriptions/7702/13 .) that list includes an ancestry field, which you could parse to find immediate children relatively easily.

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