Video observations of reptiles and amphibians

Hello!

According to the fact that we can’t upload videos to iNaturalist and many of us have a lot of video observations on YouTube and Vimeo, I decided to start this topic where we can can share links to our video observations, discuss them and interesting behaviour of reptiles and amphibians filmed on video.

As a start, I would like to share my video of breeding period of Rana temporaria (the European common frog) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkFD7ZIyDoQ

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That was most charming! Thank you for your video; it was both educational and amusing. :frog:

Thanks! ))) Hope other members of our community will share their observations

No funny narration, but these lizards made me laugh at the way she almost gets away, but not quite - over and over.

https://youtu.be/akfdcfCg1zs

Hi

I have seen quite a few observations that post a photo and then provide a link to the video.

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This giant Snapping Turtle tumbles off a beaver lodge: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KLBKoedwVc

This Turtle tries log rolling unsuccessfully: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yyZ1GuXROj8

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There’s an animated observations project
If I have a short video I’ll make a gif to post and if there’s more for a video I’ll link to it in the observation.

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it’s probably not a good idea to load animated gifs these days (if it ever even was a good idea).

i think it’s just better to load videos to YouTube or something similar, and then link back to the video on your iNat observation. if nothing else, you’ll get a broader audience for your videos.

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Yeah, I’ve read that but will continue as long as I’m able.

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When I was still living in Germany, the breeding season of our early amphibians was the most amazing time for me… I never missed it and I am still sorry that I do not have that anymore (and actually, lost most of these observations due to a harddrive crash in 2015… people, backup! :-) ).

Moor frogs at the spwaning grounds:
https://vimeo.com/64227318
https://vimeo.com/64659211

Common toad:
male defending its female
https://vimeo.com/162041365

mating ball
https://vimeo.com/264064434

And from Naimiba

Barking Gecko (only sound and habitat)
https://vimeo.com/153224874
(pic of one of theme in this obs: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/37900160)

Dwarf Puff Adder aiming to use my shadow… and me realizing in the end and quickly fleeing g
https://vimeo.com/156272384

I have a short video showing an Eastern Chipmunk, Green Frog, Midland Painted Turtles and Great Blue Heron. It was made in Six Mile Lake Provincial Park in Ontario, Canada. I admit that the music is not that great, but finding appropriate free music is sometimes problematic. I hope my future videos will be better!

https://youtu.be/hYzHCs8ZXzg

Videos are much better then GIFs! In video your can show more of animal’s behaviour then in GIF

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I agree. I actually don’t really like gifs but that’s all we can do on Inat to show a critter moving. A video can be linked to in a posted observation but it can’t be uploaded to inat, therefore a gif or photo is like a preview of the video posted elsewhere, if there is one. Most of my gifs are only 5 seconds long and I sometimes don’t have enough footage to justify uploading elsewhere anyway. I started videoing fast little creatures because it was easier to go back through the video and find a decent photo than hoping it would stop for that perfect shot.

Western ratsnake video on youtube

My Inat Reptile GIFs

Mine is on Facebook: (https://www.facebook.com/jason.hernandez.33234/videos/10216543522564726)
The caption on that Facebook post says, “Nature does not discriminate between her own constructions and ours.” These tadpoles were in a neglected jacuzzi.

About 3 years ago I recorded a tiny Midland Painted Turtle in a pond surfacing by resting on the neck of a large Common Snapping Turtle! A bold little one for sure. Here’s the link!

I regularly upload videos of my reptile & amphibian findings on my channel, so if that’s up anyone’s alley, feel free to subscribe!

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